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NEWS ID: 230
Date: 2016-04-25 16:00:02
AG: What happened when Obama was elected?
I was on cloud nine. My dealer, Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn, is very political too. She’s organized two fundraisers for Obama, and she’ll probably do something for Hillary. You know, dealers rarely do that, because a lot of collectors are Republicans—well, maybe they’re embarrassed Republicans right n

 

 

What happened when Obama was elected

Marilyn Minter studio talk 

AG:  What happened when Obama was elected?

MM: I was on cloud nine. My dealer, Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn, is very political too. She’s organized two fundraisers for Obama, and she’ll probably do something for Hillary. You know, dealers rarely do that, because a lot of collectors are Republicans—well, maybe they’re embarrassed Republicans right now.

 AG: You organized a very lucrative benefit auction for Planned Parenthood last year, and managed to get a lot of high-profile artists to donate lots. How?

MM: Well, Gina Nanni, my gallery’s press person, and I started brainstorming with Planned Parenthood after the Kiehl’s project, and we realized that there hadn’t been an auction in long time. But it couldn’t just be any auction. We knew we had to target artists who make real money—the big boys.

I couldn’t wrangle them myself, but there’s strength in numbers, so we asked Cindy and Laurie to be involved—they said yes immediately. Then Amy Cappellazzo helped us figure out which artists make the most money at auctions, and we started reaching out to them to donate. Cecily Brown was the first to agree—she gave us a $350,000 painting. Roni Horn gave us an $85,000 piece, Richard Prince immediately gave us a totally saleable painting, and so did Chris Wool, Richard Serra, and Brice Marden. Brice was actually going to give us a bigger piece, but his dealer made him give something smaller. I understand the reluctance, because you don’t want your artists at auction. But there was an alternative: Robert Gober didn’t want to be at auction, but he gave us cash instead!

AG: And this year, you expanded your sights beyond the art world and asked Miley Cyrus to be involved. Why her?

MM: Because she’s an activist. And because we were trying to bridge the generation gap by involving a young star with young fans—she has 40.5 million Instagram followers.  

She’s been famous since she was 11 and she’s a great artist, so she doesn’t care about making money—she wants to give back. She founded the Happy Hippie Foundation, which supports LGBTQ youth. She flies commercial because she’s conscious of her carbon footprint. Now she’s going to help us with Planned Parenthood.

AG: What can young people who don’t have 40 million Instagram followers do to effect change?

MM: You have to just get loud. There’s so much power in solidarity. Find like-minded people. Do whatever you can to support your cause. Be an escort to the people who have to walk through the crowds of protesters at Planned Parenthood. Volunteer. You’re fighting for yourself, your daughters, your grandchildren—for their own self-preservation as women.

This text is Honrably extracted from artsy.net by Hoomartgallery.com.